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The Year of The Rooster

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Welcome Rooster

Welcome Rooster

Sylvia Valdez

Sylvia Valdez

Welcome Rooster

Marcela Valdivia, Staff Reporter

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If you’re wondering how exactly the Chinese Calendar works, timeanddate.com is here to explain. “The Chinese calendar does not count years in an infinite sequence. Each year is assigned a name consisting of two components within each 60-year cycle. The first component is a celestial stem element, and the second component is a terrestrial branch (Zodiac animal).

“Each Chinese New Year is characterizes by one of twelve animals which appear in the Chinese Zodiac,” as posted on The Telegraph. The Zodiac has twelve sections, each indicating a time length – one year instead of one month.

The Chinese calendar is lunisolar; based on exact astronomical observations of the sun’s longitude and the moon’s phases

World Journal, hosted The Lunar New Year Festival in Downtown Monterey Park, CA. The two day event was from Jan. 28-29.The event was free and open to the public. The festival was seven blocks block at the heart of Monterey Park, on Garvey between Ramona and Alhambra avenues.  

The festival kicked off bright and early at 10a.m. with a decent crowd. The smell of BBQ plagued the air as food stands prepared for the day ahead of them. A variety of stands sprouted from the streets and welcomed everyone. There were games, rides, and raffles.

I asked Kim, a local vender who was passionately brushing BBQ sauce on a squid, what the new year meant for her. “I wear red to hopefully bring good fortune. I’ve been fortunate enough to open my own business and keep it running.”

“Wearing bright colors or red symbolizes a new start and fresh hopes for the new year. It is also to go with the festive and upbeat mood of the new year,” as explained on chinahighlights.com.

This is no lie. As I walked tent after tent, I couldn’t help but notice the vibrant banners and lanterns. Gold and red gracefully laced each tent.

Chinese New Year traditions are filled with joy and hope. There’s great food to ring in the new year and also, dragon and lion dances! Dragon and lion dances are believed to a way to pray for good luck and drive away evil spirits.

Cal State LA celebrated the Lunar New Year on campus this past Thursday, in the courtyard. One of the memorable moments was the dragon and lion dance, as mentioned above.

The luckiest things for Roosters: Numbers: 5,7,8. Days: 4th & 26th of any Chinese lunar month. Colors: gold, brown, and yellow. Flowers: Gladiola and cockscomb. The unluckiest of things: red. Numbers: 1,3, and 9.

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