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Scam is the new spam

College students are on the radar for identity thieves

All+a+hacker+needs+is+a+keyboard+and+an+internet+connection
All a hacker needs is a keyboard and an internet connection

All a hacker needs is a keyboard and an internet connection

Morguefile/nionx

Morguefile/nionx

All a hacker needs is a keyboard and an internet connection

Carlos Gomez, Web Editor

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Job scams have been a new way for scammers to get your information. Some college students have already fallen victim to these scams, so here’s a way for you to get smart and learn to protect your information.

One of the most common job scams out there is the “get something for nothing” style scam. This involves the scammer sending a job offer to the victim that requires them to buy software or texts for the job. The scammer sends a check for the victim’s “supplies” and a few hundred extra dollars for the victim to “keep”. The victim then deposits the check and purchases the required materials. However, not all the checks are valid. The check will be voided, and all the funds will be removed from the victim’s account. This means that the victim will only have spent their own money on the materials. On top of that, the scammer will now have access to your bank account through the bounced check.

How can someone fall victim to all of this? For starters, anyone who has never experienced this or hasn’t heard of it is more likely to fall to these scammers. Also, many recent graduates are common targets for scammers. They send someone to find the list of names at a graduation ceremony and zero their targets.

Cal State LA’s Police Chief Rick Wall addressed what make college graduates vulnerable to job offer scams. “A lot of students crave validation after they graduate.”

These scams are not limited to bank account hacking. They can also open up credit in your name, leading future employers to view you in a negative light, if the credit is never paid. Scammers have also posed as businesses and request personal information, including addresses and social security numbers. This is a huge red flag, and should raise concern for any recent graduates. No business or company that a student hasn’t had past dealings with will ever request this information from them.

As a word of caution, “it is important for everyone to never give up their personal information if a phone call comes through with someone asking for it,” said Chief Wall. “Always keep your passwords secret, and never easy to crack.”

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Scam is the new spam