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Occupy the Imagination

Filmmaker Rodrigo Dorfman showcases the Chilean revolution and Occupy Wall Street Movement in his film

Rodrigo+Dorfman+discussing+the+significance+of+the+Chilean+revolution+and+Occupy+Wall+Street+Movement+in+his+film.
Rodrigo Dorfman discussing the significance of the Chilean revolution and Occupy Wall Street Movement in his film.

Rodrigo Dorfman discussing the significance of the Chilean revolution and Occupy Wall Street Movement in his film.

Cara Gonzales

Cara Gonzales

Rodrigo Dorfman discussing the significance of the Chilean revolution and Occupy Wall Street Movement in his film.

Marcela Valdivia, Staff Reporter

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A special screening and discussion for the film “Occupy the Imagination: Tales of Seduction and Resistance” by filmmaker Rodrigo Dorfman took place in the Luckman Fine Arts Intimate Theatre. This was part of the ongoing show “How to Read el Pato Pascual: Disney’s Latin America and Latin America’s Disney”.

“I make my films as therapy for myself and of course they are also how I engage with the world,” said Dorfman.

For the past twenty years, Dorfman has been working on a genre known as hybrid educational neorealist films and particularly looks at the Latino community in North Carolina.

Dorfman was born in Chile and in 1970s as a child, he witnessed the first peaceful socialist revolution in history.

The film was produced after a book burning of “How to Read Donald Duck” that was written by Dorfman’s father, Ariel Dorfman. The book was written in 1971 during the Chilean revolution. However, after the military coup of 1973, the book was burned and banned for unmasking Disney’s hidden capitalist messages. This was only one of the thousands of books that were destroyed and prohibited during an era of censorship.

“You don’t burn books, you just write a better book,” said Dorfman.

Through a series of stories, the film explores the lives of individuals who struggled to create alternative spaces of cultural resistance to the Western neo-liberal model of capitalism. The film highlights the history of Chile in the revolution and the Occupy Wall Street movement in the United States.

“This film is made from a position of asking myself how does Chile and the U.S. tie with each other,” said Dorfman.

The film includes Transamerican history, magical realism and revolutionary art. Also, it answers the questions of transmission of power, transmission of culture and transmission of tradition.

“I think it was a brilliant film that has brilliant linkages with contemporary politics and what was going on in New York during the occupy movement,” said Stephanie Martinez, Chicana(o) and Latina(o) Studies graduate student.

The film was strategically divided into four sections: prologue, first part, second part and epilogue. The first part is a feature-length documentary that shows the explosion of Occupy Wall Street in New York City. The second part presents interviews and testimonials from people during the revolution that aim to spark conversations among viewers.

“I think that using Chile as a model for how Neoliberalism and how Capitalism has affected the globe was an important part of the analysis in the film. Also, how he speaks of cultural production as making interventions that are currently happening was just a brilliant way to express contemporary politics and politics at the time,” said Stephanie Martinez.

To see a display of “How to Read El Pato Pascual: Disney’s Latin America and Latin America’s Disney”. visit the Luckman Fine Arts Gallery until Jan. 2018. This event was coordinated by the Chicana(o) and Latina(o) Studies Department, Mak Center for Art and Architecture and the Luckman Fine Arts Gallery.

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